Topic: Blog

Maintenance Monday: Don’t Let Poor Drainage Take Your Parking Lot Down The Drain!

 

With the wetter, cooler conditions of fall upon us and winter in full swing, it’s a good time to check your parking lot and other asphalt applications for signs of poor drainage and damage. It’s much easier and less expensive to catch a problem early and correct it than it is to wait until that small cracked area spreads to half the lot. With this in mind, here are four signs you should look for to check if your parking lot drainage is working as it should.

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  1. Rocks or sand in unusual places

If, after a heavy rain, you notice rocks or sand in low-lying areas, this may be an early warning sign that something’s wrong with your drainage. The water from the rain may actually be eating away at the asphalt and flushing away the solid particles of sand and rock aggregate that make up asphalt. To make sure it’s not runoff from the street or areas higher up, look for consistent ripples or waves in the deposits which are larger at the higher end and taper off toward the lower side of your lot. If you see this, your lot is probably okay, unless you see large areas where the sediment and rocks have gathered. This indicates possible low spots which could cause problems later.

 

  1. Pools of water or flow down the middle of the lot

Most asphalt parking lots today are designed along a slight but apparent slope to facilitate runoff. Likewise, they are usually built with an engineered high point called a “crown,” which is intended to direct water away from the middle of the lot and down toward the drain points. Pooling and water flowing directly down the middle of the lot suggests the crown has been compromised or a possible issue with the subgrade, which will need to be addressed before the asphalt begins to buckle.

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  1. Cracking

If you start to see cracks developing, especially in areas where you also see heavy water flow and/or residue such as described above, this is a sign the asphalt is beginning to fail because the water is breaking down the bitumen binder. This may also be a sign of traffic outside the asphalt’s design tolerances being present, such as large amounts of heavy trucks or construction equipment. In either case, once cracking begins, water can infiltrate the asphalt surface and accelerate the rate of failure, making repairing it a priority before it gets out of control.

 

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  1. Are your drain inlets working as they should?

Periodically, it’s a good idea to check your streetside and in-lot drainage inlets to ensure they’re clear of obstructions and debris which may prevent them from working as expected. In many cases, asphalt failure can be traced back to a blocked drain inlet which hasn’t been corrected. Regular property walkthroughs can help you spot problems like this before they become severe enough to warrant repair or rehab of your parking lot, and keep it working the way you expect it to for years to come.

For more information about drainage or to speak with Calvac Paving about your parking lot or other asphalt and concrete construction needs, click here to contact us!


Calvac Paving And San Harbour South HOA : A New Parking Lot Case Study

 

Calvac Paving recently undertook a paving rehabilitation project for the San Harbour South HOA  association located at 906 Beach Park Boulevard in Foster City, California. The existing pavement was over 45 years old and was starting to exhibit severe cracking and base failures.

Calvac Paving setting up Primary Client Concerns

The primary client concerns included:

  • Continuous access during the milling, repaving and striping operations

  • Cost

  • Schedule and time management

  • Quality surface at the project’s end

Proposed SolutionIMG_1971

After reviewing the jobsite in person, we came up with a range of possible solutions that would meet the client’s needs.

Calvac PavingDue to sub-grade issues. We proposed milling the existing pavement down 2” from the existing surface and laying approximately 2,500 tons of ½” aggregate hot mix, in addition to the replacement of 1,500 linear feet or 90 cubic yards of concrete valley gutter. Our recommendations and proposed fix were accepted by Calvac’s client and HOA Board. The job was undertaken in phases as to not disrupt the community at one time.

Final ResultsFinished Project Piece

The end result of the San Harbour South HOA project looked fantastic! The project went off without any difficulty and was completed within the stated schedule and budget.

Calvac Paving is proud to have served the Bay Area for over 45 years with a wide range of paving, concrete and ADA access planning and implementation solutions. Why gamble with the outcome of your project? Make sure your contractor can get it done right the first time, every time. To learn more about how Calvac Paving can help service your construction job or to obtain a quote for services, please call us at 408-225-7700.

 

Calvac Paving
2645 Pacer Ln
San Jose, CA 95111
408-225-7700


7 Signs Your Parking Lot Paving Needs to be Repaired

Asphalt pavement is one of the most durable and resilient materials currently used in modern construction. It’s easy to place, maintain and recycle when its service lifespan has expired, helping to reduce manufacturing costs and greenhouse gas emissions associated with asphalt paving production. Asphalt surfaces are also very flexible relative to other paving materials, which is just one reason why asphalt parking lots have become so popular. But, like any other construction material, asphalt and concrete paving don’t last forever. A well-placed asphalt surface can last 10-20 years or more with proper pavement maintenance. As we move into the wetter, colder months, you’ll want to be on the lookout for these 7 signs your parking lot needs repair.

 

1.  Look for cracking and crumbling edges.

You’re most likely to see these signs of asphalt deterioration around joints in the parking lot paving and the curb and gutter areas of industrial parking lots and asphalt driveways, although they can occur anywhere. When this happens, it could indicate that people are driving too close to the edge, the asphalt is not properly supported at the edges or the asphalt is beginning to age out of effective service. If not sealed or repaired, the cracks can spread throughout the entire surface. Crack sealing early can help extend the life and performance of the asphalt surfaces.

 

2.  Potholes and sunken areas

These commonly occur when water seeps into cracks in the parking lot’s surface. Over time, the water undermines the subbase, causing the paving in that area to sag and crack. One key symptom of an incipient pothole is the presence of pooling water on the surface. If you notice this, a spot asphalt repair can help prevent larger and more costly problems later.

 

3.  Alligator Cracks

Alligator cracking, named for its distinctive appearance, is a sign of too much stress on the asphalt. If your asphalt surfaces look like the skin of an alligator, it can indicate the subbase was improperly prepared by the original paving contractor and/or the pavement is routinely subjected to heavier traffic than it was designed to withstand, such as parking large trucks on a residential driveway. When you see this, you need parking lot and driveway repair or replacement right away.

 

4.  Oxidization

The binding agents in asphalt which give it its flexibility and strength don’t last forever. In fact, from the moment asphalt is laid, the sun, wind, water, weather, and oil and chemical leaks from vehicles begin to eat away at them. This is why asphalt’s color fades from black to gray and the aggregate begins to peek out of the surface. Depending on the size of the area and whether other signs of damage are present, asphalt seal coat, asphalt milling, and parking lot resurfacing may all need to be considered.

 

5.  Improper drainage

Evidence of improper drainage can be an early sign asphalt repairs are needed. If water can’t drain off your parking lot or driveway it can damage the asphalt surfacing and cause larger problems later. Blocked storm drain inlets can lead to damage as well, so it’s important to inspect them regularly and make sure the runoff from your lot or driveway can go to where it’s intended.

 

6.  Faded or illegible striping

Proper parking stall and line marking make your property look better and more user-friendly. It’s also a requirement of the Americans with Disabilities Act. In addition to directing traffic, striping often works as a sort of visual canary for indicating potential issues which might otherwise go unnoticed. If your parking lot’s striping is looking worn, difficult to read, or hard to understand, you need to take a closer look at the entire area for other potential issues.

 

7.  Time

If you can’t remember the last time you had any repairs or maintenance on your driveway or parking lot, it’s probably time. For best results, your asphalt surfaces should be seal coated at least every 4-5 years to help keep them looking their best and preventing chemicals, motor oil, and water from infiltrating the surface. If there are no major issues with the asphalt surfaces, minor crack sealing and spot repairs can also be made before sealing the surface again. It’s also a good opportunity to update your parking layout and striping to comply with ADA guidelines if they don’t already!  

 

Keeping your asphalt paved surfaces in good repair isn’t just about making your property look and perform its best. Driveway or parking lot problems could also present ADA compliance issues with hefty associated fines and even open your company to workers’ compensation claims or civil lawsuits arising from injuries and vehicular damage. By making timely preventative asphalt repairs you can save time, money, and worry while presenting a more professional face for your business. At Calvac Paving, we know you have a choice of commercial asphalt and concrete paving contractors in the Bay Area, which is why we’re committed to delivering the finest in asphalt repair and driveway and parking lot construction. For your next parking lot repairs or to learn more about how Calvac can help you get the maximum life from your asphalt paving, click here to contact us.

 


5 Simple Ways To Winterize Your Paving

With winter and its accompanying rainfall on the way, the fall is a good time to take a look at your existing pavement and make sure it’s ready for the weather to come. Calvac Paving has been in the business for over 45 years, and in that time, we’ve learned a thing or two about how to solve small problems before they have a chance to become big ones. Now, we’re pleased to present this list of simple things you can watch for so your pavement lasts longer and looks and performs better in the process, even when the worst of the California winter weather strikes!

  1. Do a routine walkthrough of your paved areas.

Parking lots and other paved areas should be checked at least semiannually for problems. Things to look for include:

  • Areas of standing water. Water can break down the asphalt binder and leak down into the subgrade, eroding it over time. This is also an indication that the pavement or subgrade may already be failing, because modern grading techniques are designed to establish a grade that flushes water away from the parking area and toward designated drainage points.
  • Oil or other chemicals that leak directly onto the pavement. Just like water, some chemicals associated with vehicles can cause binder breakdown and lead to subsurface problems. Cleaning up oil and other chemical spills as quickly as possible can help prevent this and keep your asphalt in better condition.
  • Cracks, divots or uneven areas. These can be caused by weeds growing beneath the surface, freeze/thaw patterns, standing water and oil or ongoing heavy truck traffic. Small cracks and divots are often the first visible sign of possible asphalt breakdown, and it’s more cost-efficient and less intrusive to fix them when they’re small by seal coating or spot patching than it is to do a complete tearout and reinstall of the paving.
  • Striping: Old, dull or worn striping and pavement-level signage such as fire lane indicators and other information may be harder to see and read during winter months. Especially in ADA stalls, the striping and signage should always be clearly visible to make sure people know where these areas are.Recently Complete Project
  1. Clear debris from drainage channels and curbs.

If water has nowhere to go, it doesn’t matter how good the drainage plan for your lot is. Making sure the drainage channels, storm sewers and other inlets to the runoff system near your property are clear of leaves, branches, garbage and other obstructions will help the water flow better and make it less likely to pool up on your property.

Calvac Paving Team

 

  1. Limit or restrict heavy-vehicle traffic as much as possible.

Large trucks such as semis, garbage trucks and other heavy vehicles can place a lot of stress on asphalt. By itself this shouldn’t be a problem, but when the base course and subgrade are compromised by water or plant intrusion, it could speed up the breakdown process for the asphalt. If at all possible, try to limit, restrict or even out the traffic pattern for such vehicles within your lot to minimize the time they spend on your pavement.

  1. Be sure it’s sealed.

Even if your parking area is free from cracks and other problems, it is a good idea to have it seal coated every 4 to 5 years at the minimum. This is because seal coating helps rejuvenate the asphalt binder at the surface, adding an extra layer of protection against traffic, water and other spills. Even better, it will help make your parking lot and driveways look newer, especially when you redo the striping at the same time. This makes your property more attractive, safer to navigate and less likely to fail for the long haul.

  1. Seek professional help.

If you’re not sure if the paving problems you’ve identified are “big enough,” or if you think your pavement needs a facelift or a complete overhaul, Calvac Paving can help. We’ve been serving the Bay Area for over four decades with quality construction solutions including:

  • Curb and gutter remediation, repair and replacement
  • Paving rehabilitation, tearout and reconstruction
  • ADA access compliance and signage
  • And much more!

We take great pride in delivering a great product for your project, within the schedule and budget we agree upon. For more information about how Calvac Paving can help you with your  paving or asphalt project, please contact us for a no charge estimate.

 

Calvac Paving
2645 Pacer Ln
San Jose, CA 95111
408-225-7700

 


Maintenance Monday: What’s the Difference Between Cement and Concrete?

Cement Contractors

 One question we hear a lot at Calvac Paving, usually from private homeowners and people who don’t work in construction, is what the difference is between cement and concrete. After all, many people call concrete trucks “cement mixers” and refer to the finished product as “cement.” The problem is, this isn’t just inaccurate, but it can cause a lot of unnecessary confusion between contractors, engineers, and the general public. To explain why this matters, let’s start by taking a closer look at how cement, the key ingredient in concrete, is made.

 

Everything You Need to Know About Cement

Cement is not the only ingredient in modern concrete, but it is the base agent. The most commonly used type of cement is known as Portland cement, because of the end product’s resemblance to an ancient building material found on the island of Portland, off the British coast. This method of creating concrete was first patented by an English stonemason in 1824, meaning modern cement is two hundred years old!

Portland cement is created by burning and then grinding down a mixture of limestone and either shale or clay. This forms a fine, gray powder with hydrophilic properties, meaning it attracts and binds readily to water. When it is mixed with water and allowed to cure, it creates a stonelike surface, similar to plaster of Paris but far stronger and less brittle.

The problem with hydrophilic cement is that it’s both fairly volatile in terms of how readily it reacts with water and can take a long time to cure. Because of this, it has to be carefully stored in a cool, dry place to keep it in powder form until it’s ready to be made into concrete. Admixtures that help reverse the cement’s hydrophilic properties are often added to the matrix during the mixing stage to reduce the cure time and boost its strength, flexibility, and resilience.

 

How Concrete is Made

Now that we know how Portland cement is made, it’s time to take a look at how concrete is created, which is really quite simple. By adding water, aggregates from fine sand to large crushed rocks, and in many cases chemicals to the Portland cement, you can create a concrete mix that will meet target strength and flexibility profiles, a specified air content range, and even make concrete in different colors!

The quantity and percentage of cement, water, and aggregates of different sizes to be added will depend largely on what the concrete mix is intended for. On a freeway bridge where asphalt paving is not desirable, you will probably want a fairly lightweight, smooth mix. This typically requires more sand and chemicals with a larger quantity of smaller aggregates than an ornamental walkway, which obviously won’t be expected to stand up to the same stresses as a highway.

 The various dry materials are loaded onto the concrete truck at a batch plant. Each truck is supplied with a batch ticket, which shows the percentage and weight in pounds of the various dry ingredients and chemicals. Once the dry materials are loaded, the driver will add a specified amount of water. With the water added, the concrete has to be constantly agitated by rotating the drum to keep it from hardening in transit. If the mix cures on the truck, it’s nearly impossible to remove. If you’re a fan of the show Mythbusters, you may remember they did an episode where they tested a myth about using dynamite to clean out a drum full of concrete that had been set up en route to a job site.

Yes, concrete really does get THAT hard!

 

Concrete on the Jobsite

Once the mixture reaches the placement location, the tickets are often collected by the technicians who sample and test the concrete to ensure compliance with the project parameters. These technicians may be employed by the company supplying the concrete, a private third-party laboratory, or local, state, and federal authorities. About halfway through the load, if required, they will take a sample from the truck for testing.

Some common concrete tests include:

  • Slump Test: Too little or too much water means the concrete may not perform to specifications when it hardens. Many companies send their concrete from the batch plant with the minimum water possible added, because it’s far easier to add water to a drier load than it is to get water out of an overly wet one! A slump test is performed by using a steel cone to form the raw concrete into a 12-inch-high cone and then pulling the steel form away. Upon removing the cone form, the concrete cone should fall. By measuring the amount the cone falls, or “slumps,” when the cone form is removed, the technician can determine whether the concrete’s water concrete is within the proper range for the mix design to perform as expected.
  • Unit Weight and Air: These tests allow a laboratory to extrapolate from a given sample about whether the mix design as loaded on an individual truck is within the parameters specified for a given project or application. The air test is particularly important and most commonly done on high-traffic roadways which will receive a lot of exposure to the elements and temperature extremes, because too much air in the mix may allow for air bubbles to form, allowing moisture and frost to infiltrate the matrix and over time, break it up.
  • Cylinder Tests: When you hear someone talking about “pulling cylinders” on a concrete pour, it’s almost certain they’re talking about this test. The raw concrete is formed into cylinders of a specific size and depth using plastic molds and allowed to cure onsite in a temperature-controlled environment such as a cooler for at least 24 hours. After this, the cylinders are taken back to the lab, “stripped” out of the molds, and placed in a high-humidity environment to cure until it’s time to break them. Commonly, a set of four cylinders is taken from a given load. This includes one to be broken at 7 days, at which point the concrete mix should meet 70% of the intended break strength; 2 to be broken at 28 days when the concrete should have reached 100% of the specified break strength; and one cylinder to be kept on hold in case one of the 28-day breaks fails to meet the specified strength, in which case it will be broken at 56 days or as directed by an engineer. Note: Your project may have different requirements, so be sure to check with the Engineer of Record for the exact testing protocols!

Once these tests and any others the project specifications require are done, the concrete can be certified as meeting the project parameters and construction can continue.

 

Putting It All Together

Now that you know how cement and concrete are made, you can see they’re not the same thing. It’s easy to understand why some people persist in calling concrete mixers “cement mixers,” even though this isn’t entirely accurate. It’s also obvious why some people stick with calling concrete “cement,” since it’s the Portland cement that cures and makes concrete a durable building and paving material rather than just a jumble of wet rocks and sand.

However, it’s important to understand that when you ask for “cement” and you mean “4500-PSI blue concrete for an exposed-aggregate walkway,” you’re at the minimum going to cause some confusion and brand yourself as an amateur. At the worst, you’ll wind up with a pile of dry Portland cement, which on its own will certainly do you no good when you’re building a roadway or a sidewalk.

But now that you know and understand the difference, you’re far less likely to have that problem—and you’ll sound just like the experts!


Studies Show Cigarette Butts May Be The Next Hot Thing In Paving

Every year, about 6 trillion cigarette butts are produced worldwide, or about 800 discarded butts for every man, woman and child on the planet. Not only are these butts an unsightly and expensive waste disposal problem, but the toxic chemicals which the filters trap and contain leach out over time to poison soil, groundwater, rivers and oceans. Now, a researcher at RMIT in Melbourne, Australia says he may have found a surprising answer to this problem: incorporate cigarette butts into asphalt aggregate!

According to the researcher, by coating the butts with a combination of paraffin wax and bitumen, the black substance also known as “tar” that gives asphalt its distinctive properties, it is possible to trap toxins which used butts contain while repurposing them as a lightweight, flexible asphalt aggregate component. This reduces the overall weight of an asphalt mix design while removing a potential 1.2 million metric tons of waste from the planet’s biosphere.

Another interesting side effect of adding cigarette butts to asphalt is the reduction of heat. Asphaltic concrete has been directly linked to the so-called “urban heat island” effect, caused by vast amounts of asphalt in a relatively small area. Cigarette filters are mostly made from cellulose acetate, a fibrous material which is spun down to look and feel like cotton. This material serves as an insulator which filters out toxins in cigarette smoke while helping prevent burnt fingers for those who simply must light up. These filters reduce thermal conductivity and reduce the thermal density of the mix. When placed as part of a roadway the asphalt containing the filters absorb and diffuse more heat, resulting in a cooler surface temperature and less radiant heat being redirected into the environment.
The final paper on this study states that butts coated with bitumen satisfied requirements for medium- and heavy-traffic mix designs. This would apply to interstates and surface streets with heavy commercial volume. Streets in residential neighborhoods, parking lots not marked for commercial vehicles and similar applications might use paraffin-coated butts. In the study, the research team used 10kg, 15kg and 25kg (about 22, 33 and 55lbs respectively) of encapsulated cigarette butts per cubic meter (1.30795cu.yd) to determine the ideal asphalt mix.

Since cigarette smoking on a global scale isn’t likely to go away anytime soon, finding new ways to deal with  this waste is becoming a more pressing problem every day. Estimates claim that the mass of discarded cigarette butts may increase by as much as 50% by 2025 because of the increase in global population. Knowing this, recycling these butts into asphalt and other lightweight construction materials, as the author of the study proposes, may help us all breathe just a little bit easier.

At Calvac Paving, we know we only have one planet, and it’s up to all of us to care for it the best way we know how. There’s no reason that building a solid product and being ecologically responsible should be mutually exclusive, and we’re always on the lookout for new ways to incorporate green ideas into our building design.. We will keep a close eye on this and other “green” developments in construction materials, so we can continue to deliver the most environmentally sound products and processes possible without compromising on quality or durability. It’s all part of our commitment to make the communities we serve, and the world we all share, a safer and healthier place for everyone.


How Long Does Asphalt Take To Dry?

One question we often hear at Calvac Paving is about asphalt cure times. This is a great question because understanding how the asphalt curing process works helps you understand when you can safely stripe, park, walk, and drive on the new asphalt parking lot and what sort of performance you can expect from your asphalt long-term. Let’s take a closer look at how the asphalt installation process works and how this affects the asphalt curing process!

 

Asphalt Surface Installation

 

Most asphalt paving companies prefer not to place a fresh asphalt surface if the ambient temperature is outside the range of  50°F-90°F. If it’s too hot, asphalt will not cure quickly enough.  Paving when it’s too cold can cause the asphalt crack as it rapidly cools. Weather conditions can make a difference as well. If you watch carefully, you’ll notice paving companies rarely place asphalt in heavy rain. While it is possible to pave asphalt outside these parameters, it requires special preparation and oversight.

The rules for hot asphalt patch, resurfaced asphalt sealcoating and cold patch asphalt placement are a little different, so for purposes of this discussion, we’re going to focus on a clean installation on grade for commercial or residential paving like parking lots or a driveway.  

 

 

How Long Does Asphalt Take to Cure?

 

The curing time for asphalt depends on the asphalt mix design, the oil content, the temperature of the mix, the thickness of the paved asphalt layers after compaction, and the temperature and weather conditions when the mix was placed. Generally, you can open new asphalt to public foot and vehicle traffic 48-72 hours after it is placed because this allows time for the asphalt to harden, but you may need to allow a bit more time during hot weather. Asphalt doesn’t fully cure for 6-12 months, so it’s important to keep a close eye on it during this time because it will be less resistant to damage.

The reason we stress the difference between “curing time” and “asphalt drying time,” even though they’re often used interchangeably is that asphalt is designed to be flexible. For it to remain flexible, it has to retain a certain amount of moisture. Water infiltration in paved asphalt driveways, parking lots, roadways, speed bumps, and other asphalt surfaces is the primary factor leading to a blacktop drying out. The water washes away the oil which keeps the asphalt overlay flexible and resilient. You can tell when asphalt dries because you’ll notice cracking, warping, raveling, and loose aggregate appearing on the surface of the matrix, especially sand and other fine aggregates. Fortunately, it takes months to years of asphalt drying time to start noticing signs other than cracking.

 

What Can I Do to Not Allow My Asphalt to Dry Out?

 

Good roadway and parking lot maintenance programs can help prevent a lot of problems. Putting down asphalt seal coating on a regular basis, especially when you freshen up your street or parking lot striping, can help prevent more costly asphalt repairs down the line. This is also a great time to do any basin repairs and crack filling, as catching these problems early, when they’re small, can keep your asphalt fresher and more flexible for a lot longer.

Asphalt sealer drying times vary, but 4-8 hours to dry is usually enough for your sealer to ensure it will keep water out. However, the full drying process for the sealer takes around 24 hours, and it’s important to allow your sealcoating to dry completely before line striping for maximum resiliency and effectiveness. As with any other kind of asphalt sealant, you want to allow crack sealer to cure for at least 24 hours in perfect conditions, and add a day for cool, cloudy, or high-humidity conditions just to be on the safe side.

 

Final Thoughts About How Long It Takes Asphalt to Dry

 

Of course, the best mix design in the world won’t do you any good if it’s improperly placed, if your striping doesn’t meet the latest ADA criteria or if you don’t take proper care of it. For the best possible results and the greatest confidence in your paving job from breaking ground to the final walkthrough and for years of use beyond, click here to contact Calvac Paving. We’ve been proudly serving the Bay Area since 1972 on residential, commercial, and government projects of all types. Our track record for consistent quality, service, and excellence in every aspect of our operations speaks for itself. Put our experience to work for your paving refurbishment, repair, or new construction needs and see why Calvac Paving is the contractor you need for paving that works the first time, every time!

 


How Many Parking Spots Will I Need For My Strip Mall?

Happy Monday Everyone! In this edition of Maintenance Monday, one of our social media friends sent us this question.  I own a strip mall in San Jose, we have 10 retail stores, with 75 parking spots. How do we figure out the correct amount of handicap parking spots to have?  The answer is…

Thank you, In this case, 75 stalls. Three would need to be accessible spaces (not handicap), of which one of those would have to be van accessible.  One thing to consider is the current count. If this property has 5 existing accessible spaces, it is best to put back those 5.  The reasoning is that the standards are the minimum and it is not usually a good idea to decrease accessibility on a property.  This is why it is important to plan these layouts with an ADA specialist, you don’t want to create a problem in the future by guessing or overestimating today.

How many parking spots do I need?

 

 

At Calvac Paving, we have ADA Expert(Certified Access Specialists) available. Our ADA Expertspecialists serve the San Jose area as well as the greater Bay Area.


Latest Bay Area Asphalt Repair Project From Calvac Paving

Modern technology and paving practices have revealed faster, more cost-effective solutions to problems that once would have required expensive tear-out and repaving operations. One of the best examples we at Calvac Paving have ever seen was the rehabilitation of the Redwood Shores parking lot we recently undertook. This project mixed new technology with time-tested techniques to deliver a great result for the client, faster and more efficiently than conventional paving methodology.

 

The parking lot itself was old, cracked and weathered from years of use, but not so bad as to need a complete removal and replacement. Age and oxidation from poorly placed asphalt atop moisture-sensitive base material had caused the asphalt to crack and dry out, reducing its flexibility and its resilience. The parking lot was in need of a major face-lift, and Calvac Paving had the perfect product and the years of specialized talents to make it happen. This was a very unique project in that it perfectly fit the criteria for a very specific application: a Petromat overlay.

 

Petromat is a non-woven reinforcing fabric that is applied using a liquid asphalt binder known as RS1, which works as a penetrating adhesive and moisture barrier. The Petromat fabric helps to retard the existing cracks from reflecting through the new asphalt surface and gives the finished surface a higher tensile strength, thereby distributes the weight of heavy truck traffic over a greater area. After that, a full two-inch placement of hot ½”fine asphalt is placed with self-propelled paving machines.  Once the asphalt has been placed, the compaction equipment follows immediately behind the paving equipment. These very large and heavy smooth drum rollers compact the hot asphalt to a dense, smooth and uniform finish.Day 2 of the project

Once the compaction process is completed and the hot asphalt has cooled, we then apply a fog seal mixture of 50% SS1 and 50% water. This is designed to help bond the top layer of new asphalt and give it that black shiny “new pavement” look. After the Petromat overlay is 100% completed to our satisfaction, we can proceed with striping and stenciling operations.

Because of the unique considerations and time constraints of the job, Calvac Paving recommended a 2” Petromat overlay over the entire parking lot, measuring approximately 63,500 square feet. This offered the best results for the budget and gave them similar benefits to getting a brand-new parking lot for years to come, without the hassle, expense and lost time of a complete remove and replace. This project also had some very unique parking design restrictions, offering a perfect opportunity for Calvac Paving to design a new layout for the regular and ADA stalls. This redesign included larger stalls, which helped prevent unnecessary dents in car doors, making both the tenants, and owners happy with their new parking lot investment.

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Please feel free to drive by and see what a truly professional paving project should look like, and what your commercial parking lot can look like too! From a private roadway rebuild to a complete parking lot rehabilitation and much more, there are very few jobs Calvac Paving cannot do. We’ve been serving the Bay Area for more than 40 years. Now let us serve you! To find out more about Petromat or how we can help with your next project, contact us by email or by phone at:

(408) 225 – 7700

(650) 694 – 7944

(831) 375 – 7944

When you need the best, don’t leave the results to chance. Contact Calvac and have the job done right the first time, every time!

 


Calvac Paving Deploys Trash Capture Devices Inside Catch Basins to Combat Water Pollution

Our water is arguably the most precious natural resource we have, and it’s up to everyone to keep it clean so we always have access to safe drinking water. At Calvac Paving, we’re always looking for new ways to help keep our environment clean and healthy without compromising performance. Recently, we added a new tool to our arsenal in the ongoing fight against water pollution: full trash capture units inside catch basins.

If you’ve been walking down the sidewalk or happened to look at a storm drain in the middle of a parking lot recently, you may have noticed a marker which reads, “No Dumping—Drains To Bay,” such as a stream, lake or the ocean. Other such markers include reminders to be cautious of discarding trash and debris into water sources. All of these markers indicate places where trash capture filter devices may have been installed in storm drains.

 

The principle behind trash capture units inside catch basins is very simple. They work much like a pool filter to prevent dirt, debris, garbage and other runoff contaminants from getting into the water. Made by REM Filters, these Triton filtration systems are designed for drains which empty to stormwater repositories and water bodies. They have the advantage of being economical, flexible and relatively low-maintenance, while helping keep stormwater runoff cleaner and promoting a healthier environment.

With different filtration media available, property managers, owners and municipalities can design a custom system which works with the primary contaminants in a given area, such as streets, parking lots and garages, food courts, sidewalks and so on. The filters are easy to clean, change and service, allowing for broader application with reduced service and personnel costs versus conventional storm drain clearance procedures. Even better, Triton trash catch basins can be applied to both new and retrofit construction, saving time and money over other stormwater mitigation measures.

Calvac Paving has been serving the Bay Area for over 45 years with the latest and best in paving and stormwater mitigation technology. Some of the services we provide include:

·        New Construction 

·        Grading

·        Concrete Placement 

·        Asphalt Placement & Compaction

·        Striping

·        Pulverizing In Place

·        ADA upgrades to existing structures

·        Crack Sealing & Repair

·        Petromat Overlays

·        Parking Lots

·        Asphalt Repairs

·        And More! 

At Calvac Paving, we are committed to providing the best and most modern paving solutions available, while implementing new ways to make our processes and products greener and more in harmony with our environment. There’s no “Plan B” for our planet; we only have one, and it’s everyone’s responsibility to help keep it green, healthy and beautiful for ourselves and generations to come. New technology and pollution-combating policies, processes and procedures are just one of the many ways we demonstrate our commitment to a greener Earth on every job, every time. To learn more about Calvac Paving’s green initiatives, or to learn how we can help your new construction or retrofit project go more smoothly and be more environmentally friendly, call us at (408) 225-7700 or click here to contact us via email!

Bay Area Asphalt and Concrete